Purple Haze

Louisiana
United States
Abita Purple Haze Beer Can
Judges Ratings 
1 Review
81
Aroma:
19 / 24
Flavor:
34 / 40
Appearance:
5 / 6
Mouthfeel:
9 / 10
Overall Impression:
14 / 20
Description 

Purple Haze® is a lager brewed with real raspberries added after filtration. It is brewed with pilsner and wheat malts and Vanguard hops. The berries add a fruity aroma, tartly sweet taste and a subtle purple color and haze...you may see fruit pulp in the beer.

This beer is best served with salads or light fruit desserts, such as soufflés or chiffon cakes. Many people enjoy it with chocolate desserts. Purple Haze® pairs well with certain cheeses, such as ripened Brie or any dessert made with mascarpone. It’s also great paired with entrees prepared with fruit, especially citrus. Consider enjoying Purple Haze® alone at the end of your meal as dessert.

Profile

ABV: 
4.2%
IBUs: 
13
Served at: 
38° F
Hops: 
Vanguard
Malts: 
Pilsner, Wheat
Judges Review 
BC Review's picture
Judges Rating:
81
Aroma:
19 / 24
Appearance:
5 / 6
Flavor:
34 / 40
Mouthfeel:
9 / 10
Overall Impression:
14 / 20

For nearly 25 years, Abita has been synonymous with New Orleans, and their beers are now widely distributed. Although based on a lager, Purple Haze, one of their most popular offerings, is assuredly a fruit-accented American wheat beer, displaying all of the expected tart, fruity aromas and flavors. Given a post-filtration dosage of raspberry puree, this beer pours slightly cloudy, with the faintest purple tinge to its golden color, and it throws a frothy, longstanding, dense white head. Although the aroma is fruity, most judges did not consider it overtly “raspberry” as much as just a general fruitiness. There is some malt and wheat character to the nose, but it is exceedingly subdued, and the fruitiness takes center stage. Rick was one judge who picked up raspberry, noting a “huge raspberry paste/raspberry fruit leather” character, while Nick found the raspberry subtly done with a trace of sourness behind it. The raspberry made itself known more in the flavor than aroma, with all of the judges commenting favorably on the brewer’s adroitness at infusing a substantial raspberry presence without contributing “artificial” flavors. Lee was pleasantly surprised by the “punch of raspberry” accenting the faint wheat tartness, and Tom found that tartness and raspberry essence to be quenching and refreshing.