The Maharaja

Colorado
United States
Avery Maharaja DIPA
Judges Ratings 
1 Review
95
Aroma:
24 / 24
Flavor:
38 / 40
Appearance:
6 / 6
Mouthfeel:
8 / 10
Overall Impression:
19 / 20
Description 

Maharaja is derived from the sanskrit words mahat, meaning “great”, and rajan, meaning “king”. Much like its namesake, this imperial IPA is regal, intense and mighty. With hops and malts as his servants, he rules both with a heavy hand. The Maharaja flaunts his authority over a deranged amount of hops: tangy, vibrant and pungent along with an insane amount of malted barley – fashioning a dark amber hue and exquisite malt essence. Welcome to his kingdom!

Profile

ABV: 
10.4%
IBUs: 
102
Served at: 
50° F
Hops: 
Simcoe, Columbus, Centennial, Chinook
Malts: 
Two-Row Barley, Caramel 120, Victory
Judges Review 
BC Review's picture
Judges Rating:
95
Aroma:
24 / 24
Appearance:
6 / 6
Flavor:
38 / 40
Mouthfeel:
8 / 10
Overall Impression:
19 / 20

For the last two decades, Avery Brewing has shown they know hops and are not afraid to use them. The Maharaja, Avery’s contribution to the world of Imperial IPA’s, boasts over 100 bittering units and tons of flavor and aroma hops. This is truly a paean to Humulus lupulus. Redolent of Clementine peel interlaced with aromas of mist-shrouded pine forests, the nose fairly screams American hops – yet it rides over a substantial maltiness to keep things in balance. In addition to the citrus fruit and pine needle assault, Lee detected “rich, overripe mango” laced through with sweet, almost gummy malt – likening it to “a full-on firefight between malt and hops.” Like Lee, Tim felt the hops dominated the nose (in a good way), but worked to unravel traces of “ripe apples, sweet cantaloupe, and bergamot.” A deep, burnished amber, this beer lies in the glass emitting occasional ruby sparks around its edges, and is crowned by a low, off-white head. As goes the nose, so goes the flavor, with boat loads of hops layered underneath, between, and over a chewy caramel maltiness, all riding over an almost punishing bitterness. Pete praised the “firm bitterness tamed by the dense caramel-like malt,” and enjoyed the interlaced notes of pine needles and orange zest. Released in January of each year, The Maharaja can be elusive, yet the rewards are worth the search once you find it.

Advertisement

Advertisement