Brooklyn Lager

New York
United States
Brooklyn Brewery Lager
Judges Ratings 
1 Review
90
Aroma:
22 / 24
Flavor:
36 / 40
Appearance:
5 / 6
Mouthfeel:
10 / 10
Overall Impression:
17 / 20
Description 

In the late 1800’s Brooklyn was one of the largest brewing centers in the country, home to more than 45 breweries. Lager beer in the “Vienna” style was one of the local favorites. Brooklyn Lager is amber-gold in color and displays a firm malt center supported by a refreshing bitterness and floral hop aroma. Caramel malts show in the finish. The aromatic qualities of the beer are enhanced by “dry-hopping”, the centuries-old practice of steeping the beer with fresh hops as it undergoes a long, cold maturation. The result is a wonderfully flavorful beer, smooth, refreshing and very versatile with food. Dry-hopping is largely a British technique, which we’ve used in a Viennese-style beer to create an American original.

Profile

ABV: 
5.2%
IBUs: 
33
Hops: 
Hallertauer Mittelfrueh, Vanguard and Cascade
Malts: 
American Two-row
Judges Review 
Josh Weikert's picture
Judges Rating:
90
Aroma:
22 / 24
Appearance:
5 / 6
Flavor:
36 / 40
Mouthfeel:
10 / 10
Overall Impression:
17 / 20

There will always be a market for clean, flavorful lagers, and beers like this one will always hoover up that market. There's not much to ding here and nowhere for faults to hide.

The beer pours a clear pale copper with a thin white head. My sample had just a touch of haze that might've easily been confused with condensation on the glass.

The aroma is clean and simple: toast, biscuit, a hint of caramel, and some low apple-like ethanol. If there is a fault here, it's that the aroma is a bit too restrained: If you're drinking this from a typical bar tap system (in other words, way too cold) you might think there's practically no aroma at all. Let it warm up a bit; you'll get more for your money!

The flavor follows the aroma, with a substantial dry toastiness and moderate bittering. The flavor is austere, stark, crisp and clear -- like an amber rendition of a German Pils. Body and carbonation are both medium, and keep the beer from coming across as a light lager.

Bottom line: this is an excellent "drinking" beer. You could easily pop one open any time of year and enjoy it. The only real fault is that spartan "spareness" -- it's like a room with a beautiful view but no art on the walls. Even with that caveat, this is a beer you will definitely want to try (if you haven't already).