Quintaceratops

New York
United States
Quintaceratops Brooklyn Beer
Judges Ratings 
1 Review
75
Aroma:
18 / 24
Flavor:
30 / 40
Appearance:
6 / 6
Mouthfeel:
7 / 10
Overall Impression:
14 / 20
Description 

Brooklyn Quadraceratops started life as a batch of our "prehistoric" quadrupel-style ale called Quadraceratops. Having paid homage to a traditional Belgian beer style, we decided to juice it up further with another excellent historic drink: old-school Caribbean rum. And by old-school, we mean full of sugar cane, funk, and earth, the way rum tasted centuries ago. Luckily, a handful of distillers still hold fast to the old ways.

Months in Trinidadian rum barrels and a victory lap in American bourbon barrels rendered the beer deeply funky like the rums of old, with flavors of tobacco, volcanic soil, and molasses. The first sip might raise your eyebrows, but like some other funktastic foods and drinks, Quintaceratops rewards the intrepid drinker with a wild ride.

Profile

ABV: 
10.9%
Hops: 
Perle, Aurora, East Kent Golding
Malts: 
British Pale, Abbey, Belgian Special B
Judges Review 
Josh Weikert's picture
Judges Rating:
75
Aroma:
18 / 24
Appearance:
6 / 6
Flavor:
30 / 40
Mouthfeel:
7 / 10
Overall Impression:
14 / 20

I have no doubt that there were good intentions and sound reasoning behind this beer, and it may find an audience, but I doubt it will work for most people. An overabundance of liquor-like aromas and flavors - and the unavoidable ash-like phenolics - were just a bridge too far for me.

This beer is beautiful - there's no doubt about that. It pours a gorgeous mahogany with a thick tan head and is quite clear. The aromatics, though, give the first warning sign: This beer smells like straight-up rum. The alcohol impression is immediate and unavoidable, and other aromas are exposed only when the beer warms up. At that point, you get a hint of dark fruit and molasses, but they're still secondary (and maybe tertiary) after a double-hit of boozy alcohol.

The flavor is equally intense and adds substantial woody notes and a too-strong phenolic smokiness that was reminiscent of an ashtray. It's hard to detect the base beer under all of that, which is really saying something when the base is a Quadrupel. On top of all this, the body is viscous and syrupy with a harsh and tannic tightness that makes it tough to swallow.

As I noted at the top, this may well have an audience, but it hits some very questionable notes - and hits them hard enough to do damage.