La Trappe Dubbel

Bierbrouwerij de Koningshoeven
Judges Ratings 
1 Review
94
Aroma:
23 / 24
Flavor:
37 / 40
Appearance:
6 / 6
Mouthfeel:
9 / 10
Overall Impression:
19 / 20
Description 

The La Trappe Dubbel is a warm, ruby-red Trappist. This beer has a soft, fragrant, but above all refreshing, character.

Profile

ABV: 
7.0%
IBUs: 
24
Served at: 
48 - 52°
Hops: 
Hallertau Northern Brewer and Slovenian Super Steirer
Malts: 
Pale, Munich and Caramel
Judges Review 
BC Review's picture
Judges Rating:
94
Aroma:
23 / 24
Appearance:
6 / 6
Flavor:
37 / 40
Mouthfeel:
9 / 10
Overall Impression:
19 / 20

Established in Tilburg, The Netherlands in 1884, Koningshoven was the first Trappist brewery in operation outside Belgium’s borders. Considered the most commercialized of the Trappist breweries, it continues to produce traditional beers of exceptional quality and character. La Trappe Dubbel saturates the room with aromas of raisins, plums and even a whiff of cinnamon spiciness. The subtle interweaving of añejo rum, cacao nibs and sweet granola aromas impressed Rick, while Tom commented on the light peppery yeast spiciness. Tom also liked the delicate balance between the spicy and fruity aromas he considered reminiscent of Christmas fruit cake. Pouring a deep bronze and flashing orangey highlights, this brew throws a massive and long lasting head, leaving lacework all the way to the bottom of the glass. Boasting big flavors of candied fruit, rum baba and pralines, it finishes surprisingly dry and quenching. The alcohol makes its presence known, but Tim found it “well-camouflaged among luscious tropical fruit and light caramel.” Pete felt the alcohol was a bit high and lent a dry, austere finish to an otherwise sweetish brew. The judges unanimously dubbed this a classic Dubbel and felt it was certainly on a par with Belgian brethren. La Trappe Dubbel is a rich, warming beer to fortify the soul as thoughts turn to the passing of summer and autumn’s impending arrival.

Brewery Introduction

​“When they live by the labor of their hands,....then they are really monks.” That was written by Benedict, the “architect” of Western monasticism. According to his guidelines, monks should earn their own living. The Trappists who came to Berkel-Enschot in 1881 began supporting themselves with... Read More

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