La Trappe Witte Trappist

Netherlands
La Trappe Witte Trappist, Bierbrouwerij de Koningshoeven
Judges Ratings 
1 Review
93
Aroma:
22 / 24
Flavor:
37 / 40
Appearance:
6 / 6
Mouthfeel:
10 / 10
Overall Impression:
18 / 20
Description 

A slight variation on the classic Belgian style, La Trappe Witte is an unfiltered wheat beer brewed for summertime enjoyment. The only Trappist Witte available!

Profile

ABV: 
5.5%
Judges Review 
Sean Coughlin's picture
Judges Rating:
93
Aroma:
22 / 24
Appearance:
6 / 6
Flavor:
37 / 40
Mouthfeel:
10 / 10
Overall Impression:
18 / 20

Witte Trappist is being evaluated as a Witbier (2015 BJCP Category 24A) according to BJCP guidelines.

Bread dough fills the head space of the glass and dominates the aroma. The yeast profile is seemingly complex: peppercorn, clove, and a subdued tartness are evident in the aroma.  No orange peel, coriander, or chamomile notes are detected. A pleasant light hop aroma helps brighten things up with notes of peach skin and apricot. 

This is a beautiful-looking beer. A hugely dense, creamy white head floats atop for the duration of enjoyment. The beer is a straw-yellow with a slight haze, making the purity of the white head stand out even more. 

The beer is low in bitterness with a mild citrus hop flavor and a breadth of cracker-like malt flavor. Like the aroma, there is an absence of coriander and/or orange peel. The beer finishes semi-dry with a lingering wheat/hay flavor. This beer has a medium-light body, moderately high carbonation and an element of creaminess, which makes it incredibly drinkable.

 While this witbier isn’t the most characteristic of its style with a lack of coriander, orange and other spices that may pop up in the best examples, it is incredibly refreshing and has a good bit of complexity to it. A great choice for a warm-weather day when you’re craving something light but flavorful. 

Brewery Introduction

​“When they live by the labor of their hands,....then they are really monks.” That was written by Benedict, the “architect” of Western monasticism. According to his guidelines, monks should earn their own living. The Trappists who came to Berkel-Enschot in 1881 began supporting themselves with... Read More

Advertisement

Advertisement