Monk's Uncle

Washington
United States
Pike Monk's Uncle Tripel Belgian, The Pike Brewing Co.
Judges Ratings 
1 Review
87
Aroma:
19 / 24
Flavor:
36 / 40
Appearance:
6 / 6
Mouthfeel:
9 / 10
Overall Impression:
17 / 20
Description 

Pike Monk’s Uncle is an abbey-style Tripel ale with fruity esters on the nose and a dry, crisp body. Organic malts, local hops, and Belgian ale yeast provide alluring hints of honey and spice.

Profile

ABV: 
9.0%
IBUs: 
34
Served at: 
42° F
Hops: 
Nugget, Saaz
Malts: 
Gambrinus Organic Pale, Gambrinus Pilsner, Dingemans Organic Aromatic, Great Western Wheat, Rolled Oats
Judges Review 
Rick Franckhauser's picture
Judges Rating:
87
Aroma:
19 / 24
Appearance:
6 / 6
Flavor:
36 / 40
Mouthfeel:
9 / 10
Overall Impression:
17 / 20

Pike’s Monk’s Uncle was judged as a Belgian Tripel, BJCP category 26C.

Pronounced levels of spicy hops and phenols. High levels of clove and mace along with some white pepper. Hints of alcohol and lemony fruity esters are joined by a touch of grainy malt. The phenols dominate the nose, and while they don’t completely overwhelm the other elements, they are definitely the star of the show. The beer pours a pale gold with some noticeable haze and a fine creamy white cap that lingers to the end. Lots of tiny bubbles springing up warn of its carbonation levels. The flavor brings the huge spicy phenolics that the aroma warned you about. An even more distinct clove, mace and pepper quality exaggerated by noticeable alcohol. There is a slight candy-like sweetness from the alcohol as well. The grainy malt comes across a little rough around the edges. This may also be a result of the high phenolics. Firmly bitter and a dry finish. A touch of floral hops shows up for the first time in the aftertaste along with the ever-present spice. Medium-light body with effervescent carbonation and noted alcohol warmth. The carbonation level lends a little sharpness and bite.

While an enjoyable Belgian ale, the phenolics weighed a little too heavy on the palate. Overall, the beer seemed a little rough around the edges. The alcohol was less than subtle but not hot. However, one of the key elements to the classic examples of the style is the way the alcohol is hidden. The malt seemed course, grainy and wild. Again, missing a hallmark of the style. The overtly spicy phenolics may have also be playing a role in the perception of the malt. Monk’s Uncle just needs a little finesse. I do appreciate the high carbonation levels and dry finish as these are factors I often find lacking in American-brewed Tripels.